The Full Circle Connection Between Jujitsu and FMA
ACCESS OUR SCHEDULE
& EXCLUSIVE WEB SPECIAL

Secure your spot and get started today with our EXCLUSIVE offer!

ACCESS OUR SCHEDULE
& EXCLUSIVE WEB SPECIAL

Secure your spot and get started today with our EXCLUSIVE offer!

Sky Gray reviewed Full Circle Jujitsu
5
via Facebook

I am personally very impressed! Professor Ashanti and his close family of students create a friendly and welcoming atmosphere in which to learn and train, as well as welcoming my transition from another discipline. I look forward to continuing my journey with Full Circle!

Christopher James reviewed Full Circle Jujitsu
5
via Facebook

Great family atmosphere, very technically sound and great training schedule!!!!! Love it!!

Rebecca Hastings McLaughlin reviewed Full Circle Jujitsu
5
via Facebook

The dojo is clean, the vibe is wonderful, the instruction is insightful and appropriate for all levels, including me, an absolute beginner!

L Michele Galli reviewed Full Circle Jujitsu
5
via Facebook

Full Circle JuJitsu's Professor Alessandro is a welcoming, very qualified, trustworthy master who will lead you on an authentic journey of both physical and mental enlightenment. He is eager and skillful with his instruction from the fundamentals to the highest proficiency. His coaching and training ethics are a valuable resource if in search for something more than the typical main stream martial arts training options. His personal attention to his students’ interests and skill level is surprising and appreciated. He challenges each student individually according to their own strengths and weaknesses. This makes training with him a pleasure and unique because you’re growing and learning this art at your own pace and in your own way. We honor the opportunity and highly recommend him to anyone who is open to bringing their warrior training Full Circle.

Kelley Voorhees reviewed Full Circle Jujitsu
5
via Facebook

Staff is very friendly. They welcome you in and make you feel very comfortable. They use a lot of repetition, which develops muscle memory. They're happy to answer any questions you might have.

Adrienne Zimmerman reviewed Full Circle Jujitsu
5
via Facebook

Awesome instructors!!! My twins just started here and absolutely love it.

Full Circle Jujitsu Phoenix Martial Arts & Fitness for All Ages!
Call us today to get started 623-252-4140
Request Information

Blog

Our latest news & thoughts

The Full Circle Connection Between Jujitsu and FMA

Filipino Martial Arts or “FMA” for short, are the cornerstone of weapons study in Full Circle Warrior Arts.  My main study of FMA stems from the Serrada Eskrima style Founded by Grand Master Angel Cabales (October 4, 1917 – March 3, 1991).  I studied under Master Khalid Khan who was master #13 directly under GM Cabales.  I trained with him for 9 years before leaving Los Angeles to move to Phoenix, Arizona.  In Phoenix I met Master Michael J. Butz whom I studied another 3 years with.  Under Master Mike I was given further understating of my Serrada training as a bladed system, not solely stick.  This opened new worlds of opportunity to unlock the potential of the art.

In a very “full circle” sense my study of FMA has led to greater understanding of my roots in the martial arts. You can trace my jujitsu lineage directly to Dr. Florendo “Vee” Visitacion , the founder of Vee-jitsu-ryu jujitsu system. Dr. Vee was grew up in the Philipinines and learned Arnis as a child. In his later years he would return to his cultural roots and pursue further study of FMA eventually founding Vee-Arnis-Jitsu. His earliest student was the legendary Dr. Moses Powell (June7, 1910 – January 4, 1999) who taught my first sensei Soke Chaka Zulu as well as Hanshi Anton Muhammad. The jujitsu that Dr. Vee taught was laced with his early martial art experiences. At first glance of “pure” FMA one might not see the connection. The further you delve into FMA theory the more you start to see the correlation.

Jujitsu and FMA both stem from the understanding of blade work. Jujitsu has never been simply a grappling method, although that aspect is wildly popular these days as it was in the 20th century in the form of its off-shoot, Judo. Rather it is designed as a last line of defense against an opponent armed swordsman. The traditional motions take blade awareness into account. However in the modern training this is still evident and found if one knows where to look. Modern FMA styles tend to be “stick” oriented, preferring the cylindrical theory of rattan over the original blade theory of old. As Master Mike always said, stick comes from blade, blade doesn’t come from stick. The blade is there waiting to be unlocked by the right instructor. Two disparate blade oriented cultures, in my experience, came to many of the same conclusions. The differences in methods tend to be cultural and practical (e.g. armor vs no armor, katana vs bolo). There is a gap there that is easily bridged should you have serious study of both methods.